ADVANCED CLIMATE DYNAMICS COURSES / ACDC2011 / Program ACDC 2011 /

Program ACDC 2011


ACDC2011:  Dynamics of past warm climates

Friday Harbor laboratories, university of washington, near Seattle, 30 AUgust -11 September 2011

This years program follows that of the previous years; starting with 6 days of mostly core lectures on the fundamentals (August 31st-September 5th, 2011), followed by 5 days of more specialized topics (September 6th- September 10th, 2011).
Each morning starts with a summary of the previous day prepared by the students. Students will also give a short presentation on their research topic.

During the course we plan excursions in the area, as well as other social activities.

SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAMME

 

Tuesday 30th of August

 

Shuttle busses will depart SEA-TAC and the University of Washington at pre-arranged times to take participants to the Anacortes ferry terminal. The drive takes approximately 2 – 2.5 hours, and the ferry to Friday Harbor takes 1 hour.

 

Contact acdc@uib.no for details on transportation arrangements.

 

Arrival at Friday Harbor Laboratories

 

21:00: Ice Breaker

 

August 31st - September 6th, 2011: Fundamental lectures on core topics

2 x 45 min lectures with 30 min for coffee break and discussion.

 

Wednesday 31st of August (day 1)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Opening of summer school and introduction of students and lecturers – David Battisi (UW) & Kerim H. Nisancioglu (Bjerknessenteret)

 

10:00-12:15: Core Lecture 1: Dynamics

Partition of meridional energy transport between the atmosphere and ocean, with application to warm and cold climates

John Marshall (MIT)

  • Observations of meridional energy transport and its partition between A and O

  • What controls the total energy transport?

  • Mechanisms of meriodinal energy transport in the A and O.

  • Geometrical constraints on ocean circulation: gyres vs circumpolar currents

  • Role of ocean circuation in mediating the pole-equator temperature gradient

  • Experiments in paleo climate with an idealized coupled climate model

  • Ocean circulation and warm climates

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 1: Dynamics

Introduction to models of past warm climates

Jake Gebbie (WHOI)

  • From theory to simulation

  • Case studies: Pliocene, Paleocene/Eocene, deep time (Cretaceous & Permian)

  • What parts of the models (dynamical mechanisms) are robust?

  • What are the limitations of models?

  • Relating past warm climates to the future

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Short research presentations by summer school students (5 x 10min)

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

 

Thursday 1st of September (day 2)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-12:15: Core Lecture 2: Proxies

Core Lecture - Greenhouse Climate Proxies

James Zachos (UCSC)

  • Proxies of pCO2 – The early Cenozoic Greenhouse

  • Proxies of ocean temperature - Hot tropics & warm poles

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 1: Dynamics

Multiple equilibria of the climate system

and switches between warm and cold climates

John Marshall (MIT)

  • Climate may exhibit more than one stable state for the same external forcing

  • Extensions of Energy Balance Models to include a role for ocean heat transport, illustrate such behavior

  • Coupled climate models with idealized geometry also exhibit hysteresis and threshold behavior in the transition between a cold, icy state and a warm, ice-free state

  • Smooth, sinusoidal forcing of the climate system can yield a sawtooth response: slow cooling, fast warming

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Short research presentations by summer school students (5 x 10min)

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

Friday 2nd of September (day 3)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous two lectures by students

 

10:00-12:15: Core Lecture 3: Dynamics

Climate of the Earth from Archean to Quaternary

Gilles Ramstein (LSCE/Paris)

  • Archean and Proterozoic What we know

  • A "real" case study of global cooling Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth

  • Last 500 Ma Regulation of climate

  • Cenozoic climate / Onset of Ice sheets and Monsoon

  • Quaternary and Future

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 2: Dynamics

Ice sheet dynamics and vulnerability to present/future warm climate

Patrick Heimbach (MIT)

  • Observed changes in the mass of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

  • Vulnerability of ice sheets to warm ocean temperatures

 

15:00: Whale watching with dinner somewhere on the island

 

 

Saturday 3rd of September (day 4)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-12:15: Core Lecture 4: Dynamics

The global carbon cycle and controls on atmospheric CO2

Andy Ridgwell (UBRIS)

  • Introduction to the controls on marine productivity and nutrient cycling in the ocean

  • The role of marine sediments in buffering ocean chemistry and atmospheric pCO2

  • The role of weathering in the long-term regulation of atmospheric pCO2

  • A smörgåsbord of process and mechanisms and the ‘mystery’ of low glacial CO2

     

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 3:

Two lessons from past warm climates

Eli Tziperman

  • The climate of the Cretaceous and Eocene was exceptionally warm

  • The Pliocene was only slightly warmer than present-day climate, but was characterized by a permanent El Nino in the equatorial Pacific

  • State-of-the-art climate models cannot fully explain these observations even at high atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  • Are these models missing some significant feedbacks that may also affect their global warming predictions?

  • We'll discuss possible physical mechanism for both of these past warm climates and the possible implied lessons

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Short research presentations by summer school students (5 x 10min)

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

 

Sunday 4th of September (day 5)

 

10:00-10:30: Brunch

 

11:00-12:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

12:00-14:15: Core Lecture 5: Dynamics

Climate sensitivity and warm climates

Gerard Roe (UW)

  • Observations of climate sensitivity

  • A feedback perspective on climate sensitivity

  • How differently does the climate physics have to work to change climate sensitivity?

  • How does climate sensitivity change with mean climate state?

  • Do we believe in Earh System Sensitivity?

 

14:15-15:00 Coffee break

 

15:00-16:15: Specialty Lecture 4: Proxies

The geological record of ocean acidification

Andy Ridgwell (UBRIS)

  • Introduction to ocean acidification and associated carbonate chemistry changes

  • Marine biotic impacts of ocean acidification and the interpretation of laboratory experiments

  • The geological record of past carbon cycle perturbation events and implications for future impacts on marine ecosystems

 

17:00-17:30: Dinner (Note the different time)

 

 

Monday 5th of September (day 6)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-12:15: Core Lecture 6: Proxies

Synthesis of the warm Pliocene from observations

Christina Ravelo (UCSC)

  • Proxies of sea surface temperature, subsurface temperature, water chemistry, pCO2

  • Pliocene climate: pCO2 concentration, sea surface temperature distribution, deep water masses and circulation, thermocline conditions

  • Climate variability in the Pliocene

  • Long term trends and Northern Hemisphere Glaciation

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 5: Proxies

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum:

A Case Study of Climate Sensitivity to Greenhouse forcing

James Zachos (UCSC)

  • Mass of carbon released during the PETM might require multiple sources and hence points toward warming triggered positive feedbacks

  • Current reconstruction of the rise in global temperature is consistent with sensitivity to GHG forcing at the high end of current estimates, about 3-5°C.

  • Widespread evidence of a more energetic hydrological cycle and shift toward seasonal extremes.

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Short research presentations by summer school students (5 x 10min)

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

 

End of core lectures

 

6th September – 10th September, 2011: Specialty/Topical Lectures

1 x 45 min lectures with 30 min discussion.

 

Tuesday 6th of September (day 7):

 

Whole day excursion

 

Wednesday 7th of September (day 8)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-10:30: Coffee

 

10:30-11:45: Specialty Lecture 6: Dynamics

Ice in past warm climates

Kerim Nisancioglu (BCCR/UNI)

  • A brief history of ice on Earth

  • Examples of past sea level high stands (Eemian, Pliocene, Cretaceous)

  • Vulnerability of Greenland and Antarctica to warm climate.

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 7: Proxies

To be anounced

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Specialty Lecture 8: Dynamics

Arctic sea ice in warm climates

Tore Furevik (BCCR/UiB)

  • Short history of Arctic sea ice

  • Evidence for albedo feedback and polar amplification in a warming climate

  • Mid-latitude responses to reduced sea ice

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

 

Thursday 8th of September (day 9)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-10:30: Coffee

 

10:30-11:45: Specialty Lecture 10: Proxies

Climate sensitivity

Christina Ravelo (UCSC)

  • Late Miocene, Early Pliocene and Late Pleistocene as examples

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 11: Dynamics

The equator to pole heat transport problem

Aaron Donohoe (MIT)

  • How does the climate system achieve equilibrium on the equator to pole scale?

  • What are the relative roles of radiation and dynamic heat transport?

  • What mechanisms could severely alter the equator to pole temperature gradient in warm climates?

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45: Specialty Lecture 12: Dynamics

Ocean heat transport and weak temperature gradients

Brian Rose (UW)

  • If the atmosphere is so good at compensating for changes in ocean heat transport, why is ocean heat transport so effective at warming the poles?

  • The role of mid-latitude moist convection in ocean-atmosphere coupling and the global energy balance of warm climates.

 

16:45-18:00: Break

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

Friday 9th of September (day 10):

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-10:30: Coffee

 

10:30-11:45: Specialty Lecture 13: Proxies

Extratropical forcing of tropical precipitation shifts

Dargan Frierson (UW)

  • Tropical precipitation shows remarkable sensitivity to extratropical forcing, with shifts into the warmer hemisphere. Atmospheric energy transports communicate the extratropical forcing into the tropics, spreading warming into adjacent latitudes.

  • In the 20th century tropical precipitation shifted shouthward due to aerosol cooling of the NH midlatitudes.

  • In simulations of global warming, tropical precipitation shifts northward in some models and southwards in other models, due primarily to the latitudinal distribution of cloud responses

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

13:45-15:00: Specialty Lecture 14: Dynamics

Tropical feedbacks in warm climates

David Battisti (UW)

  • ENSO in the past

  • Hurricanes in the past

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:45:

Preparation of EOS article

Jake Gebbie (WHOI) & Kerim Nisancioglu (BCCR/UiB)

  • Students will be in charge of preparing an EOS article summarizing the main findings and conclusions of the summer school.

 

16:45-18:00: Break

 

18:00-18:30: Salmon BBQ

 

 

Saturday 10th of September (day 11)

 

7:45-8:15: Breakfast

 

9:00-10:00: Short summaries of previous days lectures by students

 

10:00-12:15: (including coffee break)

Student Debate

chaired by Tore Furevik (BCCR/UiB)

Knowledge of past warm climates is relevant for present global warming
After a short introduction the students will work in 6 groups. Three groups are challenged to come up with arguments for, the other three against, the statement. After discussions in groups, one from each group will represent his/her group in a wild but non-violent panel debate

 

12:15-12:45: Lunch

 

 

13:45-15:00:

Summary Lecture

Core Faculty

 

15:00-15:30: Coffee

 

15:30-16:30: Adjourn

 

16:45-18:00: Break

 

18:00-18:30: Dinner

 

 

Sunday 11th of September

 

10:00-10:30: Brunch

 

Checkout and departure, some depart before breakfast/brunch

 

 

By:
23-5 2012

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